Module - Co Production of Health (SBI123)

STP

Aim of this module

Trainees completing this module will understand how patients, carers and the general public make use of health information individually, with peers and with healthcare professionals. The module will cover the context of health, care and wellbeing, including understanding the significance of the patient journey. The module will also cover technology, new innovations and other enablers of the co-production of health, including issues around access to and the availability of systems and information; skills development; access to or shared records (Personal Health Records); and communication (between doctor and patient or peer to peer). Consideration will be given as to how patients use information resources; models of ‘information needs’ and decision-making behaviour, including relevant studies on the quality of information online. Access to and availability of systems, including user interface and experience matters and the broader context relevant to these subjects – the changing nature of the clinician/patient relationship and the role of patient’s self-care – will be included. Additionally, the module will cover different paradigms for considering the role of the internet in healthcare, including internet interventions and ideas of ‘Web 2.0’, and will introduce m-health, the role of mobile health and other connected devices in healthcare. During this module, trainees will be expected to contribute to, write and deliver policy on the provision of information for patients/public and on patient/public-accessible systems. Trainees will be expected to apply and develop their knowledge and understanding of the patient perspective on the use and application of health informatics science within the health and social care context. This will include the key factors in the co-production of health and care between patients/public and healthcare services, and the role of technology in these relationships.

Work-based learning outcomes


  1. Critically evaluate a patient information/engagement strategy (a strategy developed by a clinical team or an organisation to provide information for or otherwise engage with a particular patient/carer group) with particular reference to how patients were included in the development and how they have used the information or other resources.
  2. Perform an audit of resources available for patients, evaluate and present the results within a multidisciplinary team, and set out an action plan to address issues identified and discuss the role of audit in quality management within the clinical setting.
  3. Assist in evaluating online or electronic health resources that can be used in a range of situations, including to support health professionals and patients making decisions about the use of electronic health resources for diagnosis and monitoring purposes.
  4. Meet with patient(s) to discuss their views with respect to a health informatics initiative and present the outcome to your colleagues and patient representatives.
  5. Advise health professionals with respect to the use of information resources/internet interventions/behaviour change apps that should be recommended to patients within your scope of practice.

Work-based Competencies


Learning outcome Title Knowledge
1 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Apply information governance principles and best practice in the workplace, including confidentiality.

  • The legislation, regulatory guidance and NHS protocols regarding the security, confidentiality and appropriate sharing of patient identifiable information.
  • Role of the Caldicott Guardian.
  • The different arrangements and the associated responsibilities of clinical staff for security of all types of clinical information, especially electronically held, and for using such data for ‘secondary’ purposes.
2 1

Specify the essential components of an effective patient information/engagement strategy.

  • The role of information in the patient journey from a service delivery perspective, including in patient safety and behaviour change.
  • The role of information in choice and shared-care from patient and professional perspectives.
  • Equity as it relates to patient information sharing and accessibility.
  • The use of technologies in health information availability.
  • How to tailor a strategic approach to health information sharing according to the needs of the intended audience.
  • The role of patients/public as providers of data and information.
3 1

Work with a clinical team and/or users to gain a wider view of the effectiveness of a patient information and engagement strategy, and design a solution to address any issues raised.

  • The role of information in the patient journey from a service delivery perspective, including in patient safety and behaviour change.
  • The role of information in choice and shared-care from patient and professional perspectives.
  • Equity as it relates to patient information sharing and accessibility.
  • The use of technologies in health information availability.
  • How to tailor a strategic approach to health information sharing according to the needs of the intended audience.
  • The role of patients/public as providers of data and information.
4 1

Critically appraise a patient information/engagement strategy.

  • The application of critical appraisal skills to the evaluation of health information strategy.
5 1

Present your findings to colleagues and patients, making recommendations for revision of the patient information strategy.

  • Presentation techniques and tailoring for professional and patient audiences.
  • How to draft strategic recommendations.
6 2

Design and carry out an audit of resources available for patients, ensuring any necessary approvals are in place.

  • Audit design principles and practice.
  • Ethics and their application in information-related audits.
  • The characteristics of high-quality, effective patient information resources.
7 2

Analyse and interpret the data from the audit and prepare a written report, including an action plan and proposing solutions to any problems identified.

  • Data analysis.
  • Report writing.
8 2

Present the findings from the audit to an audience of peers.

  • How to present the outcomes of an information resource-related audit to peers in an effective manner.
9 2

Work within the multiprofessional team, building and sustaining professional relationships.

  • Effective team working.
  • Team roles and responsibilities.
  • Confidentiality.
10 3

Specify the characteristics of effective online or electronic health resources.

  • The characteristics of high-quality, effective online or electronic resources.
  • The issues and challenges associated with the provision of such resources, including patient safety, use of language and accessibility.
  • The role of digital and health literacy.
11 3

Design, document and undertake an evaluation of online or electronic health resources.

  • Information evaluation methodologies and approaches.
  • How to appraise the quality and effectiveness of online or electronic health information resources.
12 3

Appraise the approach taken and document this and the conclusions of the evaluation for presentation to peers.

  • How to reflect on and critique a chosen evaluation technique.
  • The effective communication of conclusions to peers.
13 3

Advise health professionals and patients making decisions about the use of electronic health resources for diagnosis and monitoring purposes.

  • How to reflect on and critique a chosen evaluation technique.
  • The effective communication of conclusions to peers.
14 4

Write a proposal to enable you to meet with patients or patient groups to discuss their views with respect to a health informatics initiative and gain the necessary approvals.  

  • The application of ethics approvals in patient surveys.
  • Survey design and proposal drafting principles.
  • Interviewing skills.
  • Listening skills.
15 4

Apply an appropriate data collection method or methods.

  • How to draft survey questions and manage the collection of data and information from patients.
  • Relative benefits of data collection methodologies.
16 4

Analyse and present your conclusions to the owner of the initiative and to the survey’s participants.

  • Data analysis techniques.
  • Presentation options for different audiences.
  • The characteristics of effective and high-quality health initiatives from a patient perspective.
  • Associated lessons, issues and challenges for clinicians and others owning health information initiatives.
17 5

Critically evaluate a range of information/resources/internet/behavioural change apps and identify those that should be recommended to health professionals and patients, considering the underpinning evidence base.

  • Behavioural change models.
  • Range of apps to support diagnostics and treatment.
18 5

Interpret data to provide diagnostic and therapeutic advice to health professionals with respect to the appropriate use of information resources/internet interventions/behaviour change apps to support diagnosis and long-term treatment plans.

  • Behavioural change models.
  • Range of apps to support diagnostics and treatment.
19 5

Work with colleagues and within multidisciplinary teams to ensure information is used appropriately to formulate specific and appropriate management plans for patients using electronic health resources and, where appropriate, agreed timescales with the patient and colleagues.

  • Behavioural change models.
  • Range of apps to support diagnostics and treatment.

Work-based assessment


Complete 3 Case-Based Discussion(s)
Complete 3 of the following DOPS and/or OCEs
Type Title
DOPS Undertake an audit of resources available to patients on a specific pathway
DOPS Compare and contrast local patient engagement strategy with others and discuss these with a patient engagement lead.
DOPS Investigate how patients experiences are collected and measured and present findings
DOPS Consider an information governance ethics request and detail your recommendations around this.
OCE Map the flow of information between healthcare professionals during a patient pathway or part of one for long pathways, noting how much flows via ICT, written notes, verbal communication and the patients experience
OCE Observe and present observations regarding the use of healthcare technology in a home environment, especially regarding barriers to its use
OCE Participate in an MDT meeting where the results of a clinical audit is discussed