Healthcare Science Audiology 2 and 3 (SPS220)

50 credits

Aim of this module

To provide the trainees with a fundamental theoretical background in auditory and vestibular science, assessment and rehabilitation that is essential for clinical practice and research in audiology.

To develop data analysis skills, the ability to synthesise information, their critical thinking and problem-solving skills for academic study as a Clinical Scientist in Audiology.

Adult Audiological and Vestibular Assessment

To be able to safely and efficiently maximise the information gained from the assessment consultation and develop an effective treatment plan.

Adult Audiology and Rehabilitation

To be able to safely and efficiently maximise the information gained from the assessment consultation to be able to effectively develop a treatment plan.

Paediatric Audiology and Habilitation

To be able to safely and efficiently maximise the information gained from the assessment consultation to be able to effectively develop a treatment and rehabilitation plan.

Epidemiology and Public Health

This module provides the trainee with experience of the epidemiology of disorders of hearing, tinnitus and balance. They will also explore the role of screening and the impact of disorders of hearing, tinnitus and balance on public health and the impact of acquired hearing impairment on everyday life.

Important information

The academic parts of this module will be detailed and communicated to you by your university. Please contact them if you have questions regarding this module and its assessments. The module titles in your MSc may not be exactly identical to the work-based modules shown in the e-portfolio. Your modules will be aligned, however, to ensure that your academic and work-based learning are complimentary.

Learning Outcomes

1. Explain and evaluate the statistical basis of auditory discrimination and detection.

2. Discuss and justify the need for and processes used in calibration of audiological equipment.

3. Describe the acoustics and psychophysics of hearing.

4. Describe and critically evaluate the fundamental principles of audiovestibular assessment, including tinnitus.

5. Discuss and justify the essential principles involved in the selection of subjective and objective audiological techniques for successful assessment of hearing, tinnitus and balance of adults, e.g. pure tone audiometry, acoustic admittance tests, otoacoustic emissions and evoked response audiometry.

6. Explain the normal and abnormal structure and function of the auditory and vestibular systems in adults and children.

7. Explain the pathophysiology of the audiovestibular system.

8. Describe and critically evaluate the assessment and management strategies involved in the management of audiovestibular dysfunctions, including tinnitus.

9. Describe and assess the conceptual framework underpinning rehabilitation of adults with acquired hearing impairment, tinnitus, or balance problems.

10. Discuss and evaluate factors that may influence a successful outcome in rehabilitation.

11. Discuss and evaluate current theories of amplification and signal processing in the management of hearing disorders.

12. Describe and justify the processes involved with the selection, verification and evaluation of hearing aids.

13. Describe and appraise the technical, surgical and psychosocial aspects  of implantable devices, including cochlear implants and bone-anchored hearing aids.

14. Critically evaluate the role of the audiologist in the holistic management  of adults with acquired hearing impairment, tinnitus, or balance problems.

15. Describe normal child development, including communication, attention and listening skills, speech, hearing and balance, and the effects of disorders of these.

16. Discuss the relationship between developmental age and paediatric hearing test selection, assessment, rehabilitation strategy, or referral.

17. Describe the techniques for the (developmentally appropriate) behavioural assessment of hearing in infants and children, including the scientific basis, limitations and advantages of each.

18. Compare and contrast the techniques for the objective assessment of hearing in infants and children (e.g. tympanometry, evoked potentials, otoacoustic emissions), including the scientific basis, limitations and advantages of each.

19. Describe and justify the principles and practice of screening particularly in relation to screening for childhood hearing loss and the newborn hearing screening programme.

20. Describe the critical and timely stages of assessment of hearing levels.

21. Examine the factors that contribute to a successful test, e.g. accuracy, sensitivity, reliability.

22. Discuss the principles of the planning and implementation of audiological assessment strategies, taking into account the needs of the individual patient.

23. Discuss and justify the principles of the selection, prescription, verification, evaluation and monitoring of amplification for children, including the role of cochlear implants, environmental and other assistive listening devices.

24. Assess the evidence base underpinning the planning and implementation of a rehabilitation strategy, taking into account the needs of the individual patient.

25. Explain the psychosocial and educational impact of hearing loss and auditory processing disorders on babies and young children.

26. Discuss the medical and aetiological investigations of childhood hearing loss.

27. Evaluate the range of communication options that are available to  families of children with hearing loss within an informed  choice framework.

28. Discuss and evaluate the principles of ‘family-friendly’ service delivery and the role of parents and other professionals in collaborative teams working with families with a child with hearing loss, e.g. physiotherapists, paediatricians, teachers of the deaf, speech and language therapists, ENT, AVP, voluntary sector.

29. Discuss and critically evaluate the role of the audiologist in the holistic management of children with hearing loss.

30. Appraise the psychosocial and communication implications of  an acquired hearing impairment on the individual’s everyday life.

31. Identify the prevalence and incidence of hearing, tinnitus and balance disorders.

32. Describe the prevalence and incidence of hearing, balance disorders and tinnitus in relation to demographic characteristics.

33. Discuss and critically evaluate the principles of health education and screening to improve public health related to hearing/balance/tinnitus.

Indicative Content

  • Statistical basis of auditory discrimination and detection
  • Processes used in calibration of audiological equipment
  • Acoustics and psychophysics of hearing

Audiological and vestibular assessment

  • Management of calibration programmes relevant to auditory-vestibular science
  • Diagnostic and treatment strategies in single and multidisciplinary clinical contexts
  • Objective and subjective assessment techniques for auditory-vestibular assessment of adult cases
  • Clinical history taking
  • Communication, reporting and referring Effective patient management

 Adult rehabilitation

  • Applications, classifications and theories of rehabilitation models to practice
  • Auditory and non-auditory influences on assessment of and goals in enablement
  • Social and emotional aspects of hearing impairment Processes of rehabilitation and enablement
  • Assessment, evaluation and verification of technological and non- technological interventions
  • The role of government, charitable and other agencies in adult rehabilitation
  • Effective communication, reporting and referring in a broad healthcare arena

 Paediatric assessment

  • Medical and aetiological investigations of childhood hearing loss; normal and abnormal speech and hearing development
  • Quality-assure calibration of equipment and facilities used for paediatric assessment
  • Techniques for the (developmentally appropriate) behavioural assessment of hearing in infants and children, including the scientific basis, limitations and advantages of each
  • Techniques for the objective assessment of hearing in infants and children (e.g. tympanometry, evoked potentials, otoacoustic emissions), including the scientific basis, limitations and advantages of each
  • Principles and practice of screening childhood hearing loss and the newborn hearing screening programme
  • Selection, prescription, verification, evaluation and monitoring of amplification for children, including hearing aids, cochlear implants, educational, environmental and other assistive listening devices
  • Specific issues associated with fitting hearing aids and FM systems to infants
  • The role of parents and other professionals in collaborative teams working with families with a child with hearing loss, e.g. physiotherapists, paediatricians, teachers of the deaf, speech and language therapists, ENT, AVP, voluntary sector
  • ‘Family-friendly’ services
  • Communication options for families of children with hearing loss; informed choice framework
  • Professionals and agencies to support deaf children and their families

Professional practice

  • Working in teams; the role of the audiologist as the primary healthcare professional managing intervention, treatment, referrals and reporting
  • Health education and screening principles to improve public health related to hearing/balance/tinnitus